4.09.2012

Tartine Country Bread - a recipe in search of help

The source for the recipe is this site: http://breadmakingblog.breadexperience.com/2011/02/tartine-country-bread.html

I've tried this recipe two times and it's come out the same both times. If I try it again I'm going to increase the flour or reduce the water. I'm going to post the recipe and methods and then add the paictures from along the way.

1. Grab 1 TBSP sourdough starter and add 200 grams warm water and 100 grams bread flour and 1oo grams whole wheat flour. Mix and let it percolate overnight.

2. Take half of the leaven and add it to 700 grams of water. Add 900 grams of bread flour and 100 grams of whole wheat flour. Mix.

3. Let the mixture rest for 30-45 minutes.

4. Add 20 grams salt. Add 50 grams water. Mix.

5. Put dough in a large bowl and let frement for 3 - 4 hours, turning every 15 minutes. The original recipe called for turning every 30 minutes. I doubled it this time to see if it would make the dough less wobbly. It was not sufficient to make the dough easy to handle. I'll go back to every 30 minutes the next time I try this.

5a. A turn consists of looking at the dough in the bowl, lifting the dough at the far end up, stretching it, and then folding over the bit of the dough nearest you. Rotate the bowl 90 degrees and do it again, and again, and again.

6. Dump the dough out on to an unfloured surface, sprinkle the top of the dough with flour. Divide the dough in half.

7. Flip each half over so the floured side is down.

8. Fold each half so that the floured side encompasses all of the outer surface of the dough.

9. Shape into a round shape. Cover with a kitchen towel. Let rest for 30 minutes.

10. Do letter folds on each of the halves to build tension in the loaves. Seal the loaves at a seam. Place in a bannetton to rise for 3 to 4 hours.

11. Heat the oven with a baking stone in it to 500.

12. Turn the dough out onto the baking stone. Turn the oven down to 450 and bake for approximately 40 minutes.

13. That concludes what I did for these loaves. Now come the pictures...




The dough after mixing


The dough in its fermentation bowl


The dough as it's being folded for the last time.


The dough as it's being folded for the last time.


The dough as it's being folded for the last time.


The dough as it's being folded for the last time.


Shaping after 4 hour fermentation


In the bannetton after 4 hours


In the bannetton after 4 hours


Trying to get it out onto the baking stone


Trying to get it out onto the baking stone


Trying to get it out onto the baking stone


Trying to get it out onto the baking stone


Trying to get it out onto the baking stone


Trying to get it out onto the baking stone


After baking


After baking


After baking

At least it tasted good.

3 comments:

Cathy (breadexperience) said...

Hi Scott! Wow, that is some wet dough. I'm sorry you're having such a hard time with this one.

I went back and checked the book to make sure I didn't miss something on my post, but I didn't find anything different. I baked my loaves in a combo cooker instead of on the stone, but the dough wasn't that wet when I baked it. The only thing I can recommend is to let it ferment longer. It looks like you're doing everything else based on the photos.

Anima Mundi said...

Hey,
I just saw your blog photos of this elusive Tartine loaf. I think the trick is to keep the dough at a constant warm temperature during the bulk ferment. It needs to be 78-80F and without a draft. I put mine in the oven with a preheated pizza stone in the bottom to retain the heat. The structure developed far better than when I left the dough in my kitchen, which is around 65F. Hope that helps.

Jonathan Kandell said...

My guess is your flour is not suited to this bread. I'm not seeing hardly any gluten development. It looks like doughs that are over proofed (though that's not what's happening here.). Your house isn't too hot, right?
I would just add more flour to the dough after the second fold to dry it out a bit rather than use the exact hydration in the book. Add flour till your loaves have structure after the folds but less than to where they get stuff. If it looks like normal dough you've added too much flour.